Thousands of Flamingos Flock to India's Largest City During Coronavirus Lockdown



"A major reason for the large numbers is also the large flocks of juveniles moving to these sites, following the successful breeding documented two years ago. Additionally, the lockdown is giving these birds peace for roosting, no disturbance in their attempt to obtain food, and overall encouraging habitat,” Deepak Apte, director of BNHS, told the Hindustan Times.

“Wetland destruction and developmental activities across several areas of the eastern seafront is another reason why larger bird numbers are getting squeezed into smaller pockets like in Navi Mumbai," Apte added.

Rahul Khot, assistant director at BNHS explained further, telling the Hindustan Times that "the influx of domestic sewage" is also "helping the undisturbed formation of planktons, algae and microbenthos formation, which forms the food for flamingos and other wetland birds."

"Residents are cooped up at home spending their mornings and evenings at their balconies taking photographs and videos of these relaxed birds," Khot said. "The lockdown will at least prompt people to focus on what is around them, which they had been taking for granted, and hopefully this site will be declared a flamingo sanctuary soon."

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