United Airlines pilot union voting to save thousands of jobs

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United Airlines pilots union leaders voted to approve a deal that could protect thousands of jobs as the airline industry continues to face turbulence with reduced travel during the coronavirus pandemic and federal aid drying up.

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Leaders from the United Airlines pilots union are voting to approve a deal to save thousands of jobs.  (iStock)

Members of the Air Line Pilots Association will cast a full vote on Sept. 21 for the deal that would protect around 2,850 airline jobs until June 2021, Reuters reported Wednesday.

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UAL UNITED AIRLINES HLDG. 38.30 +1.50 +4.08%

United Airlines, which has around 13,000 pilots, urged job cuts of around 16,000 employees, which may be looming when federal aid expires Oct. 1.

The Air Line Pilots Association did not immediately return a FOX Business request for comment.

AIRLINES FACE WAVE OF LAYOFFS AMID CORONAVIRUS-AID IMPASSE

Thousands of airline workers are anticipating layoffs at the end of September with the uncertainty surrounding another emergency coronavirus aid package. Airlines cannot cut jobs or reduce worker pay until the end of the month, according to the terms of a $25 billion bailout fund implemented as part of the CARES Act.

Still, many airlines have warned they will have to furlough airline staffers including pilots, flight attendants, gate agents and others without another stimulus deal.

AMERICAN AIRLINES TO FURLOUGH 19,000 WORKERS

American Airlines said in August that it would cut 19,000 workers by Oct. 1 in response to the sharp downturn in travel brought on by the pandemic.

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