Families decide who they will invite into 'bubble' when lockdown eased

Now you’ll find out who the favourite child is! Families face VERY delicate decision on which of their relatives and friends to invite into their social bubble

  • From Wednesday Britons permitted to meet with one person outside household   
  • Restrictions have left many deliberating which family member or friend to pick
  • With parents facing the difficult decision of which grandparent to meet with 

From Wednesday onward Britons are permitted to meet with one person from outside their household in an outdoor setting, as long as they maintain social distancing – but who will you pick?

For many Boris Johnson’s new guidelines, released today, have left them struggling to make the difficult decision between seeing members of family or friends.

Parents are left with the awkward task of choosing which grandparent their children will meet, while grandparents joke that they will be ‘buying all the Lego’ to ensure their favourite grandchild picks them too.

And its not about to get any easier as the Prime Minister unveils another stage of lockdown easing restrictions to come on June 1, which will see families allowed to merge with one other household.

A family are seen having a picnic in Greenwich Park on April 11, 2020 in London, England

With only two households allowed to mix together this will again mean choosing which set of grandparents to see, or for grandparents which child to see.

For parents with grown up children living in different households this could also prove a challenge, additionally it could cause problems for individuals with separated parents as they decide which parent to see. 

Taking to social media many Britons have voiced their concerns over the restrictions.

Rab Livingstone tweeted: ‘Does this one person rule mean you have to identify your favourite grandchild?’

While Lauren Willis tweeted: ‘So now you can meet ONE person from a different household…? No bother hun al just choose which grandparent is my favourite. Idiots. #thanksboris’ (sic)

Lockiebaws tweeted: ‘Pick your favourite grandparents and that’s who you go to the park with!! Yay! (worried face emoji).’

One user by the name of Rab Livingstone tweeted: ‘Does this one person rule mean you have to identify your favourite grandchild?’ 

Adding: ‘Names out of a hat. At least, that’s what I’ll tell them.’

Mrs P. Lamb replied: ‘Yes, but they also get to choose their favourite grandparent. *Buys all the lego*’

Others questioned whether the ‘common sense’ approach really meant they had to choose between seeing their mother or father when the pair live together in a household.

A family and members of the public meeting on a warm, sunny afternoon in Regent’s Park on May 09, 2020 in London, United Kingdom

Ben Hardicre penned a tongue in cheek tweet: ‘So you can sit next to others on a tube train, go to work, but you’re not allowed to visit your parents or grandparents.’

Anya Clayton issued a warning to her friends and family tweeting: ‘You better choose your one person outside your household wisely.’

Rugby player Kyran Bracken pointed out that things ‘could get awkward’ if ‘your favourite person’ doesn’t pick you back

One Twitter user, Louise, wrote of her plight after her mother said that she might not be choosing her as her ‘one person’

Joanne Stratton from Boston, Lincolnshire, tweeted her question to Boris Johnson: ‘So yes I can only see one person outside of my family at any one time outside… so if I go to my parent’s and sit in the garden 2m away one of them I can only see my mum or only see my dad?! Really? I have to pick a favourite?’  

From June 1 – if the rate of spread of the virus (the R number) is deemed low enough by scientists – households would nominate one other household and could socialise exclusively within that larger group

Rugby player Kyran Bracken pointed out that things ‘could get awkward’ if ‘your favourite person’ doesn’t pick you back – questioning why those who are working all day with colleagues can not meet them for a socially distanced ‘chat in their garden’ afterwards. 

Lockiebaws tweeted: ‘Pick your favourite grandparents and that’s who you go to the park with!! Yay! (worried face emoji).’ 

One Twitter user, Louise, wrote of her plight after her mother said that she might not be choosing her as her ‘one person’: ‘Me to mum: ‘So I can meet one person from another household in a park? Well, I choose you!’ Mum: ‘Oh. What if I don’t choose you?”

Between friends teasing ensued as one Twitter user joked that she was forced to break it to her friend that she will be meeting someone she ‘can have sex with’ instead of her. 

Between friends teasing ensued as one Twitter user joked that she was forced to break it to her friend that she will be meeting someone she ‘can have sex with’ instead of her

Nicole Dixon questioned why she would have to choose between her mother and father

Joanne Stratton from Boston, Lincolnshire, tweeted her question to Boris Johnson

One user by the name of Just Helens likened the experience of not being chosen to not being picked during a childhood lesson of PE

Ben Hardicre penned a tongue in cheek tweet: ‘So you can sit next to others on a tube train, go to work, but you’re not allowed to visit your parents or grandparents. But you’re allowed to travel as far as you like with one other person that isn’t from your household, but don’t visit parents or grandparents.’

While Lauren Willis tweeted: ‘So now you can meet ONE person from a different household…? No bother hun al just choose which grandparent is my favourite. Idiots. #thanksboris’ (sic). 

One user by the name of Just Helens likened the experience of not being chosen as someone’s ‘one person’ to not being picked during a childhood lesson of PE: ‘What if your person chooses someone else? It’s like being picked last for PE.’

Anya Clayton issued a warning to her friends and family tweeting: ‘You better choose your one person outside your household wisely.’      

One user by the name of Jersey Spurs said that the ruling was ‘odd’ as ‘grandparents come as a pair’

Simon Maxwell said that the guidance was ‘very hard to manage’ as children can only see ‘one grandparent at a time’

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